Third Place

Note: I’d like to thank my friend for introducing this concept to me. I’ve been thinking a lot about third places since hearing about it from him.

A third place is defined as the place you spend the most at that’s not your first (usually home) or second place (usually work). On a high level, this is the place you would look forward going to. Some urban sociologists have observed that people tend to be happiest at their third places, and list some characteristics of these gathering points that they suspect make it such a blissful place. Read More

Attributing Kindness

I’m not religious, but this is the image that always comes to mind whenever people compliment me for being kind.

I purchased an Uber ride for a drunk stranger on Saturday night. After the girl was whisked off to her apartment, I received some compliments about being kind for calling an Uber and making sure this girl got home safely. Not to shun people for handing me compliments, I’m just horribly shy about receiving what I think are undeserved ones. I want to bring attention some contextual facts that people may want to consider before weighing how much personality affects my kindness behavior. Read More

Incentive Schemes as a Verity to Scientific Knowledge

I was reading this very interesting story in the book “Why Zebras Don’t Have Ulcers” by Robert Sapolsky.

Two scientists, Roger Guillemin and Andrew Schally, were looking for a hormone that the brain produces that would give insight on the functionality of the pituitary glands, but the two scientists disliked each other so much that on one fateful night, they broke up and went separate ways. They were doing the same research, but in fierce competition with each other.

“Schally and crew were the first to submit a paper for publication saying, in effect, “There really does exist a hormone in the brain that regulates thyroid hormone release, and its chemical structure is X.” In a photo finish, Guillemin’s team submitted a paper reaching the identical conclusion five weeks later. One might wonder why something obvious wasn’t done a few years into this insane competition, like the National Institutes of Health sitting the two down and saying, “Instead of us giving you all of this extra taxpayers’ money to work separately, why don’t you two work together?” Surprisingly, this wouldn’t necessarily be all that great for scientific progress. The competition served an important purpose. Independent replication of results is essential in science. Years into a chase, a scientist triumphs and publishes the structure of a new hormone or brain chemical. Two weeks later the other guy comes forward. He has every incentive on earth to prove that the first guy was wrong. Instead, he is forced to say, ‘I hate that son of a bitch, but I have to admit he’s right. We get the identical structure.’ That is how you know that your evidence is really solid, from independent confirmation by a hostile competitor. When everyone works together, things usually do go faster, but everyone winds up sharing the same assumptions, leaving them vulnerable to small, unexamined mistakes that can grow into big ones. ” — pg 26-27 Read More

Day[9] & Being a Good Tutee

Note: You don’t need to know anything about DotA2 to read this.

I started playing an online game called DotA2 a few months ago and was having a lot of trouble being proficient at it (still am). My roommate suggested I watch a series of YouTube videos that follows a former professional StarCraft player, Day[9], as he learns how to play DotA from a former pro-DotA player, Purge.

I really enjoyed the videos because Day[9] is a glowing example of what it means to be a good tutee. I don’t think I seen enough tutoring sessions to figure out what it means to be a good tutee, so I really latched onto these videos when I saw them. I want to highlight a few snippets from the first two videos in the series, and point out what he’s doing right as a pupil. Read More

Detecting Magic

People throw too much magic in their explanations. How does an individual detect magic in their explanations?

What is Magic?

I think of certain technical jargon as “magic” because its intended function doesn’t educate the audience and often acts as a curiosity stopper. I call these words Magic Words because you can substitute any magical term with the term “magic” and still walk away with the same level of understanding.

To use jargon and acronyms that people don’t understand can cause poor side effects. Using Magic Words can make people feel dumb for asking and mental models built on Magic Words as premises can be faulty and lead to errors. Read More

Back to Blogging

It’s been awhile since I actively sought out social media. I’ve been privately journaling for a while since 2014. I didn’t like the person I was becoming by putting my entire life on public display. When I used to write about my day-to-day life, I realized I was doing more expositional reporting than I was reflecting on my experiences. Journaling helped me become more comfortable writing down more honest, and sometimes even negative thoughts and gave me space to reflect on them privately.

But now I want to publicly write again. Here are some reasons. Read More

What 200 Hours Buys You

Today, I attended UC Berkeley’s Korean 10A class. Korean 10A is the 3rd level Korean class in UC Berkeley, and would normally require you to take 2 semesters of Korean classes at Berkeley (Korean 1A and Korean 1B), but I blew through both level’s material through the course of summer.

I started learning Korean at the beginning of summer. I had started taking classes at the local Korean community center in San Francisco. I started out in the introductory course, Introduction to Hangeul. By the end of summer, I had skipped four levels and finished the fifth level of Korean. How did I do it? Simple, I spent over 200 hours studying Korean. Read More

Lessons I Learned While Solo Backpacking Abroad

Lessons I Learned While Solo Backpacking Abroad

 

Context

Instead of attending my 6th semester at UC Berkeley. I decided to take a semester off to travel abroad. I have had whims of this nature every spring semester now since I’ve entered Berkeley. My freshman spring I did rejection therapy. My sophomore spring I decided to hit the gym. However, this year my sporadic nature came early. By mid-way of my Fall semester, I’ve already yearned to do something new. I’ve highlighted some of the reasons in a personal note I wrote in November.

I started my journey in Taiwan. I went with two of my best friends. We explored Taiwan for 10 days before my friends headed back. I went to South Korea next, followed by Japan, taking a brief stop in Hong Kong, explored Southwestern China, journeyed through Vietnam, took a pit stop in Singapore, and eventually returned to Taiwan to relax for two weeks before heading back home. Besides Taiwan, all portions of my travel were solo backpacking, which meant I kept all my belongings in a 55 liter backpack. I stayed in hostels through the duration of the trip and booked transportation on the road. I made friends on the road but spent a large portion of my time alone. Now that my 111 days worth of traveling across Asia is over, here are some reflective points I came across. Read More

Why I Am Taking a Semester Off to Travel

Coming into Berkeley my freshman year, I would have never thought I would be taking a break from school. I was ecstatic to immerse myself in the environment of one of the best university in the world. I was gung-ho to make it the best experience of my life.

And yet, it has only been a month since I decided I wanted to take a semester break. I took some time to think about my decision, and ultimately decided this was for the best.

For those of you who wondered why I’m making this jump, let me enumerate my reasons. Read More

How to Keep Your Friends

Table of Contents

How to Keep Your Friends

Summary

Part 1: Building a Great Network

Structural Analysis of One’s Social Network

The Environment Factor

How to Be a Good Friend

Starting with Generosity

Building Trust

Showing Gratitude

Establish Relevancy

Part 2: Planning Social Interactions

Planning a Date

On Spontaneity

Argument for 1-on-1 interaction

If you must go threesome or more

Post Date Procedures

Handing Out Rejection

Part 3: Increasing Your Collision Rate

Liking Their Facebook Posts

Offering Help

Asking for Help

Asking Them For Advice Read More